Easier Said Than Done by Tia Bach

There are so many ways to motivate yourself to write. Heck, I think I’ve written about several of them in my many terms as a ROW80 sponsor.

But I’m here to admit something… I suck at inspiration most of the time. What works one day, doesn’t work another. It’s like parenting. You do some magical thing and the kid listens. Then, the very next day, they are savvy to your tricks and look you dead in the eye and do whatever the heck they want to do.

Inspiration and motivation are easier to talk about than to put into action. There is no magic pill, potion, contraption, carrot, or method that will ensure you get your butt in the chair to write.

What we have to rely on is our passion for writing plus a good kick in the pants from the friends who understand said passion. For now, I encourage you to do what’s necessary to produce results—promise yourself a treat for every 5,000 words, turn off the Internet for a set amount of time, go to Starbucks and don’t go home until you hit your goal. Whatever it takes.

If you need a new spark of motivation, visit all the amazing ROW80 blogs and see what’s working for people. Then try it. For the last two years, I’ve written a book during NaNo. Why can I write during November and struggle the rest of the year?

Honest to God, I don’t know! It makes me crazy. I dabble from March to October and then BOOM—write a book in November, shelve it for December, edit it like crazy January through March, and publish it in April/May.

I WILL break the spell this year. How?

I don’t know yet, but I will. Knowing all of you will be rooting for me will be one huge push to get me there. One thing I can tell you… if you love to write, you will find a way. Plus, you’ve taken a great first step by joining ROW80 and surrounding yourself with others who get it.

May this round grace you with motivation, inspiration, and WORDS via whatever path you choose (or paths, as the case may be).

~*~

Tia Bach

Sunday #ROW80 Summary

I’ve been listening to a book that makes me all but prostrate with awe.  Be sure in the midst of all your writing, that you take the time to refill the well.  It’s so, so important.

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Midweek #ROW80 Check-In

We’re getting rolling now.  Summer is rumbling toward its end.  Parents are dreaming with secret glee of the start of school and the return of routine.  Will you be changing your goals when that happens?

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Honoring Who You Are by Eden Mabee

Honoring Who You Are…

will make you a better writer

(among other things)

Do you know who you are as opposed to who you want to be? Do you respect that person’s needs and passions? Do you even know those needs and passions?

If not, now is the time to find out. And I mean now–not tomorrow, not next week, or the next day you have off from work. No, not even this evening after supper when you can finally relax in your favorite chair with your feet up and soothing music playing in the background. Instead, this evening watch that show you love so much. Watch and think about why you like it so much and what brings you back week after week. Don’t worry. It’s not only “OK” to start learning about yourself now and do some of the work later. If you are doing things right, you’ll be doing a lot of the discovery later.

Why do you want to do this?

Well, knowing yourself will help you understand how you best deal with difficulties and help you initiate real change. Accepting yourself will make the process more pleasant. Acting combination of the two in your daily dealings with yourself will make you a better writer. (Really, it will help you in all sorts of ways, but as this is a writing challenge, pardon my focus on that activity. The initial exploration and discovery will help in any area you want to immerse yourself in)

Now, as this post is about you, indulge me please as I discuss myself for a moment and explain how knowing and respecting my process and myself… my personal way of doing things, has made me a better writer.

Having things “Just So” seems to be a trait of many writers, and using pen and paper are my “just so” items. I keep shelves of dog-eared dictionaries and reference books. Little tweaks complete each experience… different music genres, writing flumped on a bed or leaning at a high-top table offer various moods for the session. When I include these things for my process, I write more, I write faster, and I am usually happier with the result.

I’ve learned (sadly through trial and error more than through any amount of deep analysis) what I need to make my writing work. And the “work” has regained some of that early on sense of play it once had, so I tend to send more time at it. With the extra time and practice, I write more, and my writing has improved. Win-win!

However, this is a new development. I mean, I used to do those above things all the time when I started writing. I used to fill notebook after notebook with stories, character sketches and poems. Even after typing in several of them, I still have over two crates full on the floor by my desk, begging their turn at the keyboard. Then… one day, I stopped scribbling. I forget if it was a move from of our more crowded apartments or the excitement of a new computer… or even the push to post wordcounts after some writing challenge or sprint. Likely, it was all those things and more… Either way, I stopped. I felt like I was writing in the Dark Ages, and that everything I did was unprofessional and sloppy. Where was my determination to place Butt in Chair, Hands on Keyboard? All that paper wasted! (And here I’d gone to college for Environmental Science and Forestry). Wasn’t I taking more than twice the time to get a draft done by winging things longhand as opposed to organizing my story in a Scrivener Binder? (Not knocking Scrivener, btw… I love the program.)

What am I trying to say here?

I’ve read blog after blog from people who’ve thought similar things and tried to change their writing process either to streamline it or to make it “work”; some have succeeded, and so many others have not. My process could have benefitted from some streamlining, but it worked. It worked well for me, and my attempts to adjust things reduced my productivity dramatically. A computer with internet (or even a solitaire game) offers me too many ways to escape my own head and the page. Trying to learn how to type correctly as opposed to my four-finger hunt-and-peck never worked the way I hoped it would. Irregular changes in computer software, crashes, viruses… it all amounted to distraction and reduced wordcounts.

It took me years to figure out what went wrong. I was trying so hard to fix something that wasn’t broken, because I kept looking at what wasn’t instead of understanding what was and accepting how I did things. I couldn’t even make a meaningful change without knowing what the actual process was.

In order to get anywhere, it helps to know where you are starting.

I sabotaged myself for over ten years because I couldn’t accept how I worked and who I was. I don’t want to see all my writerly friends do the same thing to themselves. So please, take some time to look at what you do and why you do it. Take regular account of what inspires you, what turns you off, what distracts you and how you feel after a break (do you feel refreshed and ready to go or are you inspired to take a bit more time off?) and so many other things. Learn how to work with yourself.

Discovery takes time. You’ll (hopefully) be working on self-discovery for the rest of your life. It is a process well worth your time.

(For more about the person we are versus the person we want to be, watch this video by Kelly McGonigal; it’ll help in making those changes if you choose to, or at least help you pick your battles better.)

Sunday #ROW80 Check-In

Two weeks down.  I hope you’ve found your stride.  Now that you’re warmed up a bit, why don’t you try stretching things a little?  Take that daily or weekly word count or page goal and see if you can up it by 5-10%!

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Oh, oh. You’re a writer? You’re it! By Beth Camp

You may find yourself invited to play tag these days. A kind of virtual blog hop tag where you answer four questions about your writing process on your own blog and then tag two or three others to do the same, sometimes within the week, sometimes on a specific schedule. The questions are a little innocuous, and yet, there’s something endlessly fascinating about the responses, that allow the reader to look behind the door or under the veil.

Essentially we are being asked: Who are we as writers? How do we do what we do? Here are the “official” questions:

  • What am I working on currently or just finishing?
  • How does my work differ from others in this genre?
  • Why do I write what I do?
  • How does my writing process work?

Not everyone wants to play, even if they first say yes, for we all know how hard it is to say no.

So when one of my writing friends hit a wall and couldn’t post her response, I invited a colleague from my working days, Sandy Brown Jensen.

Sandy writes poetry, paints, teaches writing, and has embarked on something called digital storytelling, combining voice and image in a video. She is committed, each day, to be creative, to inspire others, and to write. In this photo, she talks about a painting by her sister, Cheryl Renee Long.

And here is Sandy’s video using VIMEO, “The Current is Everything” — her response to the first question: What am I currently working on?

Her video brought me to tears, in the way something true and exceptional evokes that emotional response.

Technology continues to change how we read and how we write. Yes, I carry my Kindle with me everywhere, a neat repository of books read and unread. I have used a computer for decades now, the keyboard invisible as I type, research immediately accessible. And we will all learn new techniques for publishing, marketing, and now, perhaps digital storytelling.

Here at ROW80, we are an online community of writers. We bitch and moan, we make goals, we celebrate our struggles and our accomplishments. And each week, we inspire each other.

What is it that keeps us writing is some inner voice, sometimes dark, sometimes stubborn, sometimes that germ of creativity, characters that grab us and do not let go, our irrepressible connection to that which is essential – our unique voice. Sometimes we work slowly. Sometimes we suffer from what is truly known as writer’s block, that inability to put the words we want down on paper.

With each twice-weekly check-in, we build our own progress towards our writing goals. We persevere. We will challenge ourselves, regardless of the medium, to tell our stories from the deepest part of ourselves. As Natalie Goldberg says in Writing Down the Bones, ““Write what disturbs you, what you fear, what you have not been willing to speak about. Be willing to be split open.”

So if someone invites you to play tag, consider saying, “Yes!” Dive into those four questions. Articulate who you are as a writer and write!

~*~

Beth Camp