Read, Read, Read. By Beverley Baird

I didn’t know what I would write for this post. My first thought (and my 2nd, 3rd, etc thoughts ) was – what do I have worth saying?

And then I really looked at the APC (Art Playing Card) I had made and I realized how true Thomas Jefferson’s words were – “I cannot live without books.”

 

books 001

 

Books have always been a part of my life. I wrote about my “Reading Touchstones” in March for the March Slice of Life (a writing challenge throughout March, where we all wrote a slice from our lives)  – and the importance of books throughout my life – from childhood  (Anne of Green Gables) to teen years  (Diary of Anne Frank) to my brush with Catholocism in my 20s  (In this House of Brede),  to my teaching years (The Book Whisperer) and to my growing art life (The Artist’s Way). There have been so many books that have impacted me in some way or another. Sometimes it was just to lift my spirits or take my mind off exams or problems.

 

So many of these books have become a part of me and have shaped me – as a woman, a mother, a teacher, an artist and as a writer. I have kept many of these books, and refer to them as needed. SomeI have read several times. Many I have passed onto othersw or bought copies to give away (The Artist’s Way in particular)

They have given me an immense measure of happiness yes, but many have also become mentor texts for my writing.

 

So many authors offer writing advice and so many stress that reading and writing must go hand in hand.

Here are a few quotes that stress the importance of reading to improve one’s writing:

Stephen King: “Read, read, read. ”If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write.”

 

Ian Rankin:  “1 Read lots.  2 Write lots.”

 

Michael Moorcock:  “ Read. Read everything you can lay hands on. “

 

PD James: Read widely and with discrimination. Bad writing is contagious.

 

Evan Maloney: “Reading is essential for writers – it instructs, inspires and offers a blissful escape from the blank page.  

 

We read to be transported, to visit new lands, meet new people.

We read to learn the traits of the genres we seek to write; to learn the language; to learn lessons in dialogue, setting, mood, tension.

 May you all read and read and read and then write and write and write.

 ~*~

Bev Baird

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