General

Wednesday Check-in Week… Hmm!

Well, I miscounted it seems.   I thought today would be the last check-in of Round 1, but it’s not.  We have 8 more days to go.  (At least, the grand “X Days to Go” counter on the sidebar seems to be working right.)

The good news is that gives you an extra week to plan your goals for Round 2!

Until then…  just give us your progress at the froggie:

Sunday Check-in

Welcome to another weekly check-in…  somewhat late yet again.  I’m still trying to figure out all the tweaks our ROW80 creator (the delightful Kait Nolan) made to the site when she was preparing to close down the blog half of the ROund of Words for good.

So many of these tweaks are just little things, like the “Join the Challenge” tag in the bar above us that tosses everyone right into the Facebook Group, even if they aren’t Facebook fans…  It’s not a big thing, so much as a bit of an “I don’t usually think of it” sort of thing.  So…  a smallish request, if you would.

Please let me know in the comments below if you try a link and it works oddly.  Or if you just can’t find the information you’re looking for…

This is your ROW80 too.

And, given that… lets tell us how you all are doing:

Oh! and a bit of a FYI since this (possibly temporary) linky setup seems to have confused a few people, here’s how you do it:

  1. add your blog URL
  2. add your name
  3. add your email (this is not published)
  4. click “Enter your link”
  5. done…  unless you want to use the Tweet/FB feature

And there!  Have an awesome Writer’s Week!

Construction Zone

under-constructionHi!

You may not remember me.  My name is Eden Mabee, and I’ve been a part of the ROW80 for a few years now.  It’s a great place for supporting ourselves and our fellow writers, a place for sharing accountability and friendship.

Some of you remember when A Round of Words in 80 Days ran solely in the blogosphere.  Some of you, like me, remember it as a more malleable creature that mostly lived in blogs, but also had a good showing in our Facebook group.  And some might remember when we packed our bags to move into Facebook “for good”.

But… it wasn’t all “good”.  Whenever there is a big move, things can get left behind, and some of those things are hard to replace.  Some of those “things left behind” were members.  These members, who aren’t comfortable with Facebook and its policies or were people who loved Facebook too much (like myself) and knew they needed to dole out their time there….

The change hasn’t been all bad.  The Facebook page is gaining ground.  We’ve proven we are a community that stays together and finds ways to “Make It Work”.  This effort on my part is to transport of those lost treasures back into our community space.

Hope you ‘ll come along for the ride.  If you do…  here’s the new linky for this week.  😀

Sideways Up The Slope by Shan Jeniah Burton

What do you do when you’re stymied, and it seems like nothing is getting you any closer to achieving your goals?

Sometimes, I find answers in the efficiency of nature.

Take the sidewinder rattlesnake. Here’s a video of her in action. A note for the squeamish – nature doesn’t offer grocery stores. Like all wild predators, Miss Sidewinder has to take other measures if she wants to eat.

You’ve been warned.


The sidewinder makes forward progress…by going sideways.

How does that relate to my trickiest writing issue – revision?

For many years, I had no real idea how to revise. I poked aand tweaked, but I was missing major pieces of the puzzle. They didn’t fall into place until I channeled my inner sidewinder.

Yup – I “went sideways” up the steep sandy slope.

Miss Sidewinder has venom, but she also has a problem: she lives in a climate where she stands out.

When I first tried to revise a novel, anyone who looked could see the tracks I made. Where revision should look seamless, mine was as obvious as a snake sidewinding her way up a sand dune.

Miss Sidewinder has to conceal herself to catch her dinner. She digs herself into the loose sand, where her coloring helps her blend in. The horned scales over her eyes keep sand and glare out.

I needed to learn how to immerse myself in word-sands, and wait for my prey. I hadn to observe carefully, so when the right prey came along, I’d be ready to strike. Instead of horned scales, I have an adaptable human brain. I can learn things that help me capture my quarry – revision that goes somewhere without being obvious about it.

Miss Sidewinder uses her lateral movement to scoop out the sand. Once she’s wiggled a hollow out, she curls into it, letting the sand slide back in to cover her. Then she waits for her moment.

I went sideways, too. I read a book called Rock Your Plot, and learned about key elements like story structure and the need to understand my character’s goals, motivations, and conflicts. That led me to Rock Your Revisions, and I wiggled out a hollow in my mind and settled in.

Eventually, seeing what needed to happen in revisions got a lot clearer – and the drafts I’m creating with my new plotting know-how are faster and cleaner right from the start. My prey is easier than ever to catch.

Miss Sidewinder also has an inborn imperative to perpetuate her scaly species. Once she gives birth, Mama Sidewinder stays at the little burrow, guarding her young.

Mama’s Little Sidewinders are cold-blooded babies. The desert outside the burrow is too hot for them to survive at first. Their underground home is too cold. Mama can’t share her body heat, the way warm-blooded critters can.

Caught between deadly extremes, the baby snakes do something amazing.

They work together, forming a net at the entrance to the burrow with their tiny, writhing bodies, and regulate their collective body heat to a very constant temperature . Each baby takes turns, always moving, and, together, they do what’s needed to survive.

There’s something to be said for banding together, networking to reach the collective good, with every member making contributions and reaping rewards as others do the same.

After NaNoWriMo 2015, three other local writers and I formed a critique group. Our goal is to each submit one piece weekly, and critique the works of the other members. I also do beta readings and reviews for other members of the writing community.

This might seem like a sideways approach. I have several WIPs of my own awaiting revision. Surely I could get through them faster if I weren’t spending hours each week offering input to other writers, right?

Maybe not.

I want a sustainable writing business that brings in a modest income. I need to learn how to revise as efficiently as Mama’s Little Sidewinders maintain their body temperature.

If I only revise my own writing, I’ll always know what I meant to write. I might see that rather than what’s actually there. I would always know the backstories, and the process of creation, and I’d cut myself slack whether I meant to or not.

Joining a group where I give three critiques for each piece I submit quadruples my workload. ButI want to become proficient at the principles that will help with all revisions. The distance and objectivity of critiquing and beta reading for others gives me lots of practice where I don’t know the “inner core” of the story – the vision only its creator can have.

In return, I get critiques from my three partners. Each has a unique way of reading and specific skills that mean that I get three distinct opinions on each piece I submit. I’m learning a lot from the comments and questions I’m getting, and from reading and critiquing their work.

We are all sidewinders in ROW80! By setting our own goals, being accountable, and by visiting one another to offer kudos, encouragement, or commiseration, we’re banding together like Mama’s Little Sidewinders, in a network aimed at collective success, but which relies upon each individual doing their part.

Let’s slither sideways up the slopes of our writing challenges, and band together for the common good as we move into the final weeks of Round Three, and beyond.

Write Anything–Even If It’s Wrong by Eden Mabee

Hi, all! Hope you don’t mind, but you are now my test subjects for an experiment. I want to know: Is it really better to “do (write) anything, even if it’s wrong“?

See, my husband spouts this (witticism) all the time: when we’re discussing plans for the new kitchen design or what we might like to plant in the garden, where would we like to go on vacation… basically for all things. A lot of it is in retaliation… self-defense(?) for my Analysis Paralysis (and his, and our son’s… it’s really a family epidemic here at Chez Mabee).

So, as I’ve been suffering another bout of The Other Writer’s Block lately, I figured I’d do something about it this time, and I would take you all with me as I did. I am going to try out Writing Anything, even if it’s Wrong. Because if I wasn’t writing this post, I have nine drafts I started and tossed in my recycle bin on such topics as: Writing Begets Writing, The Process of Habituation, Is Too Much Positivism Hurting Your Progress, Why So Negative

Any single one would be an excellent sponsor post. But each time I pull one out, I reach a point where I can’t get beyond my research and note taking to condense the expansive ideas into a coherent post. Perhaps they haven’t percolated in my mind enough yet; perhaps I don’t understand them as much as I feel I do; maybe they just aren’t speaking to me… no, I wouldn’t have gotten as far as drafts, if that were the case…

No, in this particular case, I know exactly what is wrong.

I know (meaning I feel) I can’t do them (or you all) the justice they deserve. These are such important topics, after all. And this is a sponsor post, damn it! I can’t just toss out some word, half-cocked and hope that they’ll come off as something meaningful. I owe it to you,, to my craft to be careful, to make sure all my Is are crossed and my Ts dotted–wait!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chimera_%28mythology%29

Ain’t it cute?

The point is, to use Shan Jeniah’s wonderful phrase, I have this obnoxious pet in the house called the Chimera of Perfection (don’t get one if you can… they eat everything, take up the bed every night, sit at the corner of your vision demanding attention and fuzzles when you most need to get some work done). I don’t know how he got here. Yes, I do have a bad habit of caring for strays (as anyone who has ever read my blogs about the backyard cats and strange couch-camping roommates can attest, but I think I would have at least seen this thing before it moved in.

I admit, I’m a bit intimidated by this guy. How do I get him to move out without risking life and limb? It’s not like I can refuse to feed him; he just raids the cupboards on his own.

But something needs to be done. I’m a sponsor this ROWnd, and part a sponsor’s duties involve writing a post to inspire our fellow ROWers. Why did I accept being a sponsor if I knew this post was going to be such a trial? I mean, I struggle with this issues every time I sponsor. I dread it. I waffle, I bitch and moan, I make a ton of “possible drafts”… I always submit my pieces late (Kait just loves me). But I do it. I’ve done it several times. And I’ll keep doing it.

What does one feed these anyway?

Because I find, even when I struggle with the post, that the act of making myself write something… even when it’s wrong, inspires me to try harder. Because getting those words down is a powerful act. Determination and action are the basilisk’s* stare to the chimera’s talons. And though it can be hard to move that rock that’s been holding you down out the door and into the yard for the birds to perch on, it’s energizing. You won’t believe how strong, how capable you are after you’ve done this.

Wait… one need a gorgon to do that. Ah, well–just proved the point…

Write something, write anything… even if it’s wrong.

(*Don’t worry… you can always get rid of these by judicious application of weasels!)

 

~*~

Eden Mabee

Why I Love Camping by Steph Beth Nickel

There’s the sleeping outside no matter what the weather … No, that’s not it.

There are the l-o-n-g walks to the bathroom … Nope, not that either.

There’s the wide variety of wildlife you may run into on your way to said bathroom, especially at night … Hey, I like wildlife, but not creatures like raccoons, skunks, and bears who may not take kindly to being surprised.

How about the coin-operated showers with boxes just a little too far to reach when you’re soaking wet and need to add another quarter because the shampoo is still in your hair? Not so much.

Wait! Maybe I should have given this piece the title “Why I Don’t  Love Camping.”

But there is a type of camp that provides almost all the fun and none of the inconveniences of actual, real-life camping, the kind without soggy tents, distant bathrooms, skunks, bears, and soapy hair.

In case you haven’t guessed, I’m talking about Camp NaNoWriMo.

Unlike the original NaNoWriMo, camp takes place twice a year: once in April, when nobody (or only the extremely hearty) wants to go camping in my neck of the woods (pun intended) and July (for those of us who aren’t out doing “the real thing”).

Instead of committing to writing 50,000 or more words in a single month, Camp NaNo allows you to choose a goal as low as 10,000 words, much more doable. Another perk: As I understand it, the powers that be at NaNoWriMo expect you to write 50K words in the same project. With my eclectic sensibilities, writing a total of 10-15K on a variety of projects works way better for me.

Like out-in-nature camping, you can choose to be in a cabin, either with a group of friends or random strangers. Thus another advantage over the OIN variety. Actually sharing a cabin with total strangers could very well prove to be a bad idea—dangerous even. (Plot idea!)

And with a cabin full of fellow writers, they’re gonna notice if you’re not writing—as long as you don’t fudge your daily word count tally. This accountability and the arrow that moves closer and closer to the middle of the target are great motivators.

The stats page shows not only the individual’s progress but also the progress of the cabin. Are you and your fellow campers on track to “win” the challenge? I like working toward common goals and attending Camp NaNo is another way I can do that.

The wind can howl. The snow can fall, which it did a short time ago. The critters can roam freely about. No problem from my perspective.

I’m in the midst of Camp NaNo and having a blast. No bears. No skunks. No raccoons. (Though there is the frequent chirp of crickets, but those are for my daughter’s bearded dragon.) And one more thing: my bathroom is right downstairs.

Why not consider joining me in July. Hope to see you then. Maybe we can share a cabin. (It’ll be safe. I promise.)

Find out more at campnanowrimo.org

~*~

Steph Beth Nickel