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Being Accountable by Elizabeth Mitchell

Kait’s opening post https://aroundofwordsin80days.wordpress.com/2015/04/06/are-you-author-or-victim/

this Round hit a nerve, I admit.  She points out that making excuses, feeling like a victim, is a choice.  The crux of the problem is the safety of being the victim, because you have someone or something else to blame. I admit, I play it safe far too often.  The day job, the family, the dogs, or just being too tired or empty-brained, all get in the way of getting my writing done.

 

However, no one has all the time in the world to do what they want, so choices must be made. If writing matters to me, I will get up early, stay up late, or not watch that TV show (curses to on-demand television).  “If something blows up your plans to write, you need to revise them.  MAKE some time to make up for the lost work time,” Kait says, and she is spot on.  RoW is a supportive place to be accountable, and to keep one from being too hard on oneself as well.

 

Another arena I often act like a victim is how I compare myself with others. I sometimes suffer from jealousy when I look at other RoWers’ goals and word counts. I am a slow writer, seldom able to lock my infernal editor in the laundry room.  I always forget that comparing myself to others is apples to oranges.  Kait posted a link to Chuck Wendig’s post http://terribleminds.com/ramble/2015/04/08/counting-words/

about word count and comparisons.  If you don’t follow his blog, think about doing so. I will give the caveat that, as my late mother-in-law would have said, he swears like a sailor. Even if you find strong language offensive, his posts are always interesting, and often grounding.

 

In the word count post, Mr. Wendig celebrates a day of writing 10,000 words.  He then immediately addresses the twinge of jealousy that hits some readers, including me, calling it bs.  Compare with yourself, not others.  Much as it hits me as the 90’s “personal best” my kids heard in school all the time, he’s right. “Sometimes, writing is a game of inches. Sometimes it’s a act of great, clumsy leaps. You gotta take pride in the small steps as much as in the big jumps.”

 

Mr. Wendig links to a plan  http://terribleminds.com/ramble/2013/02/20/how-to-push-past-the-bullshit-and-write-that-goddamn-novel-a-very-simple-no-fuckery-writing-plan-to-get-shit-done/ to get the writing done. If I write 350 words a day five days a week, with weekends off, I would have the first draft of a novel at the end of a year.  With a little bit of found time, and found effort, I would be closer to my goals.  His last advice resonates: “Shut up and write.”

Who will jump into the accountability pool with me?

~*~

Elizabeth Mitchell

How to Juggle It All (Or What Happens When All The Balls Fall) by Fallon Brown

I often get asked how I get it all done, or at least how I can get so much done. And sometimes I feel like a bit of a fraud. I don’t “do it all”. Not anymore than anyone else. The truth is, I only do what I can. And often that doesn’t feel like enough.

 

We all have a bit of a juggling act we have to do in life. For some, it’s a day job and family. For someone else, it could be finding time for their hobby among their other responsibilities. I dropped the day job ball almost eight years ago. Not because of writing, at that time. Along with it being just before my daughter was born, we moved out of town(and by that, I don’t just mean to another town. We now live outside of town). Added to that, any money I would have made at a job in our town would have gone to childcare, so we figured it was better for me to stay home.

 

Now both kids are in school, and I still haven’t picked that ball back up. Of course, that doesn’t mean I don’t have other balls to juggle. There is still family, making sure the kids get ready for school in the morning and get them off buses in the afternoon. And of course, they seem to think they need to eat every night. Then, there are other chores that need to be taken care of each day or at least week. They think they need clean clothes after all, and clean dishes to eat off of.

 

And there are other things that take up time. For me, it’s knitting, crochet, and reading. For you, it might be something else. As important as writing is to me, I need something else to relax me. Especially since writing tends to energize me. In fact, I rarely get that drained feeling from writing too much in a day(I get that feeling when I struggle to get the words out, though). So, I need something to wind back down.

 

So, how do you juggle all the things you need to do, the things you should do, and the things you really want to do? I guess it depends on where all those balls fall in the list of priorities. Most of the time, for me, writing falls between ‘should’ and ‘really want to’, with it leaning heavy to the ‘really want to’, and I make it a priority. The ‘Need to Do’ are sometimes the first ones that get dropped. Didn’t get the dishes done? Well, we still have a couple clean plates and forks. It can wait until tomorrow. I have found a pretty good routine that helps me balance, or at least juggle, everything. For the most part.

 

But, then there are the times when it feels like all the balls are dropping. Early in April, I was struggling with the words. Because I was trying to get all my words in first thing, I let the chores fall away too. Since I got behind on those, I fell behind on my knitting and reading, too. And I found out that like with writing, when I don’t get to read I feel a little crazed.

 

Sometimes you just have to pick the balls up again. For me, this usually involves moving whatever didn’t happen to the next day. Sometimes these lists can get long. But, I always start the next week over fresh, even if I ended up not accomplishing everything I wanted to. I use the weekends to catch up, particularly on my crafting or reading.

 

And sometimes you have to leave the balls where you drop them. Or at least adjust your juggling routine. I realized what one of the problems with my words was. Well, there were two different problems really. The first was an issue with the scene I was writing, and something I just had to push through. The other was the fact that another character was busy demanding my attention even though I hadn’t planned on writing that story yet. So, instead of fighting it, I rearranged my routine and split my daily word count between the two stories. Since I did that, words started flowing so much better.

 

No one is perfect. I’m sure we’ve all heard that before, and it’s true. We’re not always going to make our word count. We may miss a deadline or two. We’ll forget that one other thing we were supposed to do. But, we do what we can. And the “what we can” is different for everyone. I know mine might seem like a lot to some people, and yet most days I’m telling myself I could probably get more done. But, I know it could be that one extra ball that upsets everything.

~*~

Fallon Brown

Time To Refocus by Steph Beth Nickel

What should someone like me write?

 

I love movies, from CG to sci-fi—and many genres in between.

 

I love television, from old sitcoms to crime dramas—and really, what else is there? (Just kidding . . . sort of.)

 

And given endless hours to read, I would almost always gravitate to novels—primarily, but not exclusively, Christian fiction. Both my physical and my virtual shelves are bending under the weight of unread volumes.

 

I even have an idea for a series of contemporary Christian novels bee-bopping  around in my head, the first of which is fairly well planned out.

 

But what have I written over the last number of years? I’ve co-authored a Paralympian’s memoir. I’ve written dozens of poems, hundreds of blog posts (beyond ROW80 check-ins), and recently, I’ve written and recorded over 50 devotionals for HopeStreamRadio.

 

Yet, somewhere in the back of my mind, I somehow have always thought that when I publish a novel, I’ll be “a real writer.”

 

Strange . . . because I don’t see other nonfiction writers as anything less than they are. There’s probably a whole psychological thing going on there, but that’s not what this post is about.

 

And there’s the whole gamut of skills required to write captivating fiction.

 

Just because I love to get emotionally involved with the characters I read about doesn’t mean I could create a protagonist who isn’t “too stupid to live.”

 

And just because I love a story that can make me laugh—or sob—aloud doesn’t mean I could weave together a plot with that much intensity.

 

And my favourite novels of all? They grab me by the throat and won’t let me go. I can only begin to imagine the amount of time and energy it takes to create a book like that.

 

So really, is novel writing for me?

 

And is it any less fulfilling to continue writing nonfiction and poetry? Will I still be a writer if I never see my name on the cover of a novel?

 

Remember what I said about the television shows I enjoy? Because I’m all about relationships, I’m all about the back-and-forth between characters—their relationships—and this is something I just don’t get from documentaries and cooking shows.

 

By the way, I teared up at the end of Night at the Museum 3. “Real” relationships were ending. Sigh!

 

I love to grab a new novel and get to know the cast of characters and how they interact with one another. And recently, I’ve discovered the joys of re-reading. It’s like visiting old friends. I’m enjoying several of these stories more the second time through. Oh, my! My To Be Read pile just got a lot higher.

 

So, will my novel ever be on someone’s TBR pile? I’m not really sure. But I do know a thing or two. I am a writer. I will seek to further develop my skills and write the best poems, blog posts, and nonfiction I can.

 

Sometimes it isn’t about something else. Sometimes it’s about the project right in front of you. If you’re like me, you may just have to refocus in order to recognize it.

 

 ~*~

Stephanie Nickel

 

 

 

Writing Through Calamity by Starr Bryson

Since many of you don’t know me, you perhaps don’t know my tales of woe.  The most recent of which includes several weeks where we got to play the guessing game of, “Water:  Will We or Won’t We?” in which the pipes in our house were frozen in an on again/off again fun game of winter temperatures.  The adventure ended with busted pipes, a flooded basement, and piles of dirty dishes; not to mention a very hippy-esque non-showered me at my wit’s end.

 

Just for added fun, life threw me a cold so nasty I couldn’t get out of bed or even function for several days.  Migraine headaches, sore throat, coughing fits, all of this and more came to visit me.  While I attempted to keep up with work I hardly managed that, let alone writing anything.

 

But even when we don’t have calamities and disasters in our households or sickness that halts our everyday lives – we still have life to deal with.  Life, in and of itself, can suck the minutes right of your day and the creativity right out of your brain.  You can wake up early, motivated to begin your day with all of the best intentions, and think, “THIS is the day! This is the day I will accomplish all 5,678 tasks on my To Do list, take care of the kids, get through my work, and make time for writing!”

 

But, before you know it, it’s dark outside, there’s dishes from dinner stacked all over the kitchen, fifteen people are pulling you in twenty different directions, not a thing got crossed off that To Do List, and your day is careening to an end without you ever touching your writing.

 

Sound familiar?

 

When life gets busy, even a short story can feel as daunting as The Great American Novel.  Sometimes even a blog post is too much to contemplate.  A simple update on Twitter or Facebook can amount to “all of the writing I have time for.”

 

How do you keep up the momentum on writing projects?  How do you stay inspired?

Make Time for Writing

If you have a busy schedule, then you’re going to have to schedule in your writing time.  You can’t wait for inspiration to strike or the perfect moment.  You won’t find the time if you don’t make the time.  Writing is important, or at least it should be.  Everything else in your schedule is important enough to have a chunk of your precious time set aside for just that task – make time for your writing.

Make writing a priority

More than just penciling in a time to write every day, you need to make writing a priority in your life.  Life is about balance, and part of that balance is sometimes making hard choices.  Sometimes we have to give up one thing to make room for another.  If being a writer is something you truly want to accomplish, then it might be time to take a look at your daily activities and start making those hard choices.  What can you give up in order to write?

 

Obviously, family obligations and work are not an option.  But, could you give up an hour of watching television every night?  Social activities?  No one ever said being a writer was going to be easy.  If you really want to be a writer, you are going to have to make room for it in your life.

Remember the Love of the Craft

Once we make writing a priority and we’ve scheduled it into our busy calendars, it can seem like a chore.  Once something is a chore, it’s no longer fun.  What was once a fun past time is now a job.  Writing might come to be an event that we resent, a time slot in our schedule no more fun than car pooling or doing dishes.

 

Trash that attitude right now.

 

Think back to when you first began writing.  What did it feel like?  Was it magical?  Did your fingers fly over the keys in a race against your brain to create fantastical lands of romance and adventure?  Was it a cathartic therapy session; you pouring out your feelings of helplessness and frustration onto the paper?  Did writing excite you, heal you, lift you up, and help you dream?

 

Was writing, once upon a time, your favorite place to visit?  Did you look forward to creating worlds with your words, inciting emotions in your readers, pouring emotional vomit onto the paper?

 

Think of all of the reasons you love to write, all the pride you feel when you call yourself a “writer”.

 

Remember when your relationship with writing was a brand new, heart pounding, head spinning romance?  Remember when the relationship was new, before life got in the way?

 

Remember that feeling.  Remember why you fell in love with writing.  Tap into that love and don’t let those feelings go.

 

Writing is a rewarding relationship. But just like any relationship, you have to make it a priority and keep the spark alive.  Writers need to fuel that fire, keep the romance alive with their craft.

 

Reconnect with your writing.  You’ll fall in love all over again.  And it will be magical.

~*~

Starr Bryson

Inspiration Is A Fickle Friend by Molley Mills

Being inspirational is difficult when you’re not inspired. This winter has left me entirely uninspired, with a capital I. It’s cold and we’re buried in snow. We’ve also had our turns of being cut down by the dreaded lurgy and shared our germs with each other with gay abandon! You’d be amazed how many rounds a cold can go when you’re living in close quarters and the outside temps are something straight out of the arctic.

Life throws curve balls like that and as writers we can use those experiences to flavour our words. Having ideas is a minute by minute thing for me and part of the writing process, so it counts, right? Those ideas are waiting to be developed and put onto paper or keyboard, which ever is the prefered method. But I never stick to my goals, life gets in the way. I’m terrible at it. I make plans and list and flow charts…and then nothing. It’s just the way it is, especially this month, since I played single parent while my husband was away on his much needed reconnection trip to the homeland.

I try to set time aside but there’s always a distraction, I guess learning to work through those is something I need to try harder to control. Accepting your flaws and working with them can help though. I often think of those pie charts about writers, who have all the time to develop their writing and yet, the night before deadline, they’re burning the midnight oil to finish, and surprisingly the product is good. Is it inspiration or sheer panic that motives them? Probably both. I’ve been guilty of that since the second year of middle school. I’ve always been the night before Queen. But when it comes, if you can just let it flow, then magic happens… or drivel, that happens too.

Be kind to yourselves in this writing process. Expect to ebb and flow with ideas and inspiration and writers block and crappy product. In amongst it all there is mastery, and that’s why we continue because we know somewhere deep down we have things to say, unique things and interesting ways of seeing the world. And someone is waiting to connect with that, use our words as an inspiration to their daily struggle.

Isn’t that why we write?

Yeah it is….

~*~

Molley Mills

Sometimes One Has To Be Patient by Alberta Ross

Sometimes one has to be patient.

 

I’m not that patient really. Would like everything at once but life rarely works like that.  We all of us here want to pen that masterpiece.  We struggle through employment, family commitments, ill health and just not enough hours in the day. The difficulty is too hang onto our dreams to believe that one day it will happen.  It will if we want it enough. But.

 

But but but.

It may take time and patience.

 

Long ago, when a child, I thought it would be neat to write a book.  I produced a hand drawn paper book of a few pages all about a rabbit – Master Rabbit to be sure. My parents kept it, proud of their child even if they weren’t proud of her spelling. We are talking about the late 1940s here. It spurred me to think one day I would write a proper book. Then I began to make a list of other things I was going to do.

 

I was a child of few ambitions, I didn’t want husband ,child or career, but the ones that I had were great in magnitude.

 

I wanted to travel the world(half the world was in  bombed ruins!)

I wanted to go to university( I was deemed too stupid to sit the children’s exams, and anyway girls didn’t really go to University)

I wanted to fly in a hot air balloon (not many about back then)

I wanted to go to Antarctica (no visitors allowed)

I wanted to write a book

I wanted to have my own little house(with wild garden and a couple of cats)

 

In the meantime I was at school dreaming my life away, deemed too stupid to bother with.

 

I grew up,began to look after children and began the travel; a decade + had gone since I first voiced this ambition.  I didn’t stop for years.

 

I managed to go on a course for hot air ballooning for my 40th birthday three + decades after I first voiced this one.

 

University, in a menopausal hiccup, in my late 40s was achieved and ‘stupid me’ got a BSc Hons and an MA. During this period I also got the chance to go to Antarctica, with the help of a legacy left my sister. Amazing

 

The house I managed after retirement,having it built just how I wanted it to be.  Nearly six decades after my childish dream.

 

The books followed a year or two later.

 

 

A long time to fulfill my ambitions, people say, but the time was never right, or the money was never there. Life and employment can grip one as tight as any chains. I never lost the dreams and grabbed opportunities when they came and, in the meantime, I lived life as it came, enjoyed myself, made friends, did some smaller interesting stuff. Collected memories and experiences and can say hand on heart I have had a good life.

 

The point is I achieved what I wanted eventually .Maybe not all at once, but with patience, and a fair amount of doggedness.

 

This last two years I have been struggling with heart failure which saps my energy and lays me low.  It quarrels furiously with my desire to write, sulks and sends me to bed if I try to finish  my WIP.  But I am defeating it.  I am slowly getting my own way.  I had to rethink my schedule a couple of times, accept the WIP wasn’t gong to be the speedier affairs of earlier books.  But I will finish it and I will write another. There may not be decades still in my life to wait, but I’m good for a few more years yet:)

 

If family or work is confining you, despair not.  Children grow(so quickly) money  hopefully becomes less of an issue (although it is more of one in my case!).  In the meantime you have accumulated memories, experiences and life  and love, all of which will feed into the writing and fling the words up high.

 

We must enjoy what we have, what we cannot change.  Hold on to our dreams of that masterpiece.  Be part of the world and garner every sensation we can while we wait for the dreams to come true.  ROW80 allows this.  Does not go for guilt or failure.  Smiles and tells us gently that all is well in this crazy closed world writers inhabit.

~*~

Alberta Ross